What economic collapse may look like in Soviet CNY

This lengthy but very readable article presents a comparison of two empires collapsing: the Soviet Union and the United States of America.

The Soviet Union achieved a higher level of collapse-preparedness through sheer negligence and poor economic performance. So can we, if we (don’t) try.

Which of these two reminds you most of CNY and Upstate New York?

Bumping up to add: This post was linked to at Politicker, but with a somewhat incomplete and misleading description. I’m not comparing CNY to Soviet Russia for the sake of comparing CNY to Soviet Russia, as in “Ha ha, look how derelict CNY is.” The point of the article I’ve linked to is that any place that resembles Soviet Russia may be better equipped to handle a “collapse” than, say, someplace more prosperous — like Atlanta or NYC, although I dare say NYC is better off than Atlanta. (Whatever “collapse” means. The author of the article describes scenarios).

4 Replies to “What economic collapse may look like in Soviet CNY”

  1. Interesting comparisons, ones that I think most Americans prefer not to think about. The folks at the secessionist Second Vermont Republic (http://vermontrepublic.org/) have been arguing like this for years, as have the “small is beautiful” economists that call for a down-sizing of state power into regional or local jurisdictions. Of course, you never hear those voices on CNN, Fox or MSNBC as they always trot out the same “free” market, unregulated trade proponents.

  2. I first read this on a housing blog shortly after it was releaed. I’ve been experiencing and discussing the coming downturn through the eyes of bloggers that were mostlylocated in Florida, NYC, Texas, Arizona, Midwest and California. I am breathing a huge sigh of relief to see someone finally bring up this subject locally.

    Thank you NYCO.

    Re the article: I always thought CNY had enough skill sets we could set up a good barter economy if worse came to worst. The only wild card in my mind was gas rationing in a hyperinfationary scenario. With no real public transportation that would really put a crimp in local productivity.

Comments are closed.